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Title Industrial Heat Pumps, Optimization and Application
Author Markussen, Christen Malte
Ommen, Torben Schmidt (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark)
Supervisor Elmegaard, Brian (Thermal Energy Systems, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark)
Kærn, Martin Ryhl (Thermal Energy Systems, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark)
Reinholdt, Lars (Energy and Climate, DTI Technological Institute)
Institution Technical University of Denmark, DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
Thesis level Master's thesis
Year 2010
Abstract This project aims at identifying the current status of industrial grade heat pumps using natural working fluids and their potential in the future Danish energy system. Four specific cycles have been investigated, namely a condensing vapor (R717 and R718), a transcritical (R744) and a compression absorption hybrid (R717/R718). It is attempted to substantiate or reject a claim that industrial grade heat pumps should be developed and implemented as a part of the Danish energy make up. Literature studies are conducted in scientific papers and technical publications to establish the working limits of these cycles as well as the current status and direction of research within the field of industrial grade heat pumps. Based on exergy analysis an economic evaluation is performed. Based on scenario analysis in STREAM indications are observed to support, that large scale thermal production using heat pumps has an alleviating effect on the future Danish energy system. It has been quantified what consumption and emission reductions are to be expected if the Danish industry were to get an incentive for recovery of waste heat. Average reduction values are estimated at 40 % for all harmful emissions considered. This is accomplished by recovering as much as 20 PJ of waste heat. All four working cycles have had their working domains established based on current data from industry. Given working constraints such as Tsink and Tlift the models are able to identify the process with the lowest cost per heat unit and dimension the individual components using thermoeconomic principles. All sink temperatures from 50-125 °C can be achieved with todays equipment and 150°C will be realistic within a foreseeable number of years. For a specific case the waste heat potential was sought verified. An apparent saving potential of almost half the continuous consumption of the specific facility was established, amounting to 300 kW. Furthermore a heat pump potential for external sale of approximately 61 kW was found on the basis of the developed thermodynamic models. It is the recommendation of this study that large measures should be taken in order to mature and implement heat pumps as an integral part of the Danish heat production system. Furthermore it is vital that government and legislators take initiative and produce incentives for implementing such systems in all sectors where large amounts of waste heat are generated. These technologies are vital if emission goals are to be met and society’s dependence on fossil fuels is to be reduced.
Imprint Technical University of Denmark (DTU) : Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
Pages 92
Fulltext
Original PDF Speciale.pdf (9.81 MB)
Admin Creation date: 2010-11-04    Update date: 2010-11-04    Source: dtu    ID: 268604    Original MXD